World Earth Day 2018

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Monteverde, Costa Rica

Today, April 22nd, is World Earth Day and this year’s campaign is entitled “End Plastic Pollution”. Plastic pollution is poisoning our oceans and land, injuring marine life, and affecting our health. This year’s campaign is dedicated to providing the information and inspiration needed to fundamentally change human attitude and behaviour about plastics.

Watch this short video for background to this blog if you like (not essential but I think it is a good video to put the issue in context): The Majestic Plastic Bag – A Mockumentary.

Why is plastic an issue?

The headlines about the current state of the environment are grim- icecaps melting, species disappearing, water tables drying up, or one of the most devastating environmental issues to date: The Great Pacific Garbage Patch which is twice the size of Texas, has 7 million tons of garbage up to 2.7 metres deep in some places, and is destroying our ocean and murdering our marine life.

It is estimated that 80% of the plastic in The Great Pacific Garbage Patch originates from land; floating in rivers to the ocean or blew by the wind into the ocean. The remaining 20% of the plastic originates from oil platforms and ships.

But don’t lose hope, something inspiring and exhilarating is happening- and if you pay attention, it just might reinvigorate your motivation to help make a better world. There is a global outpouring of passion and ingenuity to solve our eco-troubles.

So, how does this relate to my yoga and lifestyle blog?

Be the change you want to see in the world

Yoga is more than just sitting on a mat and doing some asana (physical movements), pranayama (breath work) and meditation. It is about observation, dedication, peace, and love not only for ourselves but for our fellow humans, animals and our planet. We must make our way back to the basics and align ourselves with the original intention of what a yoga practice truly means, which I believe, is living a complete, peaceful, balanced, liberated and compassionate life, in which asana is only one small part.

So, I urge you as part of your yoga practice that you take it off the mat, look further than to yourself and think about the kind of planet you want to live in, the kind you want your children and grandchildren to live in and then be the change you want to see in the world. No act is too small.

“The beauty of small acts is that they cannot be stopped. There is no inconsequential action, only consequential inaction. Real transformation originates from the bottom and moves outwards.” – Paul Hawken

 

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For a beautiful ocean for our children’s children, say no to plastics today!

 

How can you make a change?

Take some time to be in nature. Spend quiet, reflective moments in meditation. Ask yourself what kind of world you want to live in and what you can contribute to the quality of life on Earth. Then offer up your best!

Here are some things that you might like to think about changing immediately: Stop using plastic bags at the supermarket, refuse to buy packaged food- especially fruit and vegetables, pre-packaging them is unnecessary and wasteful, stop buying bottles of water, or think of creative ways to reuse plastic items that you have already purchased, so they don’t end up getting washed into our rivers and eventually into our oceans.

Some things that you might like to think about changing in your community: Write to your local government with suggestions about improving recycling in your town/city or contact your local supermarkets (if they still use plastic bags) and demand that they stop using them.

Some things to think about on a broader scale: What is your country doing to clean up the mess their oil platforms they have made in the ocean?

If you’d like to get started straight away on this special day, you can make a pledge to reduce the amount of plastic that you consume on the following link: I pledge to reduce my plastic usage or for more information about this year’s campaign: Plastics campaign 2018.

 

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For a beautiful Earth for our children’s children, say no to plastics!

 

Lokah samastha sukhino bhavantu (A powerful mantra for peace)

This Sanskrit phrase translates into English as ‘May all beings be happy and free, and may the thoughts, words and actions of my own life contribute in some way to that happiness and freedom for all.’

 

Namaste, Natalie

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Our greatest power is within

“Every genius has known something of the inner more than the outer world; find your inner power.”- Unknown

Never forget that your greatest power is within! Here’s an inspirational tale from ancient India that I just can’t wait to share with you:

Long back, humans were as powerful as the gods. But somewhere along the way, humans lost their way and starting misusing their powers. So, the gods held a meeting to discuss possible solutions. All gods agreed that the superpowers had to be removed from humans. Once decided, the gods had to decide where to hide them so humans couldn’t get them back.

One god suggested, “Let’s hide them in the top of the highest mountain.”

“No, they’re really courageous, they will climb it,” answered another.

Another said, “Then we’ll hide them in the bottom of the ocean.”

“No, they’re so clever they will find a way to it,” replied another.

Finally, one god said, “Let’s hide them really deep inside them. Since they’re always looking outside for everything they will have no clue that all the powers are deep within them.”

All the gods agreed that this was the best hiding spot for the superpowers and so the superpowers were hidden deep within each and every human.

Find, reclaim and then embrace your hidden superpowers.

Love and Sunshine,

Natalie

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Wondering where this beautiful photo was taken? Click on the following link to be redirected to my travel website to read about how to get here and view more photos like this one!

Why I eat healthy

I don’t believe in fad or strict diet regimes but this is just my opinion. I believe in a balanced life with yoga, meditation and good wholesome foods that makes your body work 100%.

For me eating a healthy (I do occasionally fall off the bandwagon) food is a way of life. My advice to anyone is to skip the diet and instead listen to your body and always chose the healthiest option.

My parents took great care of my brother and myself when we were kids. We always had a plethora of fresh fruit and vegetables to choose from and our meals were healthy and nutritious. We played outside all the time- climbing trees in our backyard, swimming in the pool, shooting hoops at the local primary school, skipping ropes, kicking soccer balls, hitting tennis balls around with the tennis racquets, jumping on the trampoline for hours, competing in handstand and cartwheel competitions with our neighbours (one of which ended up training in the Olympic squad) and so forth.

We had 3 home-cooked meals a day and all the snacks were healthy. Mum would bake us blueberry muffins and whip up fruit smoothies after school or she would cut us up fresh fruit and vegetables as snacks. Take away foods such as McDonald’s and KFC were a treat, not a weekly occurrence. It wasn’t until I got to university that I started eating this type of food on a semi-regular basis. Moving to another city without your parents is a good way to learn how to take care of yourself but for me it took a long time to realise just how to take care of my body properly.

Getting up whenever I felt like it, going to bed late, drinking, partying and not eating properly was the beginning of sending my health into a downward spiral. All my healthy habits went away as I started to embrace new bad habit like eating McDonald’s and pizzas (Pinky’s had $5 large pizzas and one would last me a few meals), drinking soft drinks (especially Coke) and drinking alcohol.

In preparation for my wedding in 2013, I gave up Coke and all soft drinks. Since then I haven’t drunk any Coke and I could count on one hand the amount of times that I have had another type of soft drink. In addition, Damien and I did a detox a few years back and I haven’t been able to stomach McDonald’s since.

Damien and I cook healthy, nutritious meals and when we do have hamburgers and pizzas they are homemade with lots of vegies. I have also replaced my entire white sugar intake with natural substitutes like honey.

We often go hiking and biking on the weekends so we need the energy that good wholesome food provides our bodies. We like to go on one major holiday a year where we will be active the whole time- from hiking, climbing volcanoes, and bike riding to snorkelling, white water rafting, and kayaking- we enjoy being active in the outdoors and we don’t have time to be sick or not have the energy to do the activities we enjoy doing (if you are interested in reading about our travels, please click on the following link to be directed to my Travel Blog).

Life is so short and I don’t want to make it even shorter. I have so many things to do and so many places to see. This is why I eat healthy.

Love yourself enough to live a healthy lifestyle.

Namaste, Natalie 

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Day 9- 7/10: Tolka to Australian Base Camp (10.29 kms)

On self-worth & Inner Strength

“You are braver than you believe, stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think,” said Christopher Robin to Pooh. –AA Milne

One thing I learnt from trekking in Nepal (Please visit my travel blog: Tolka to Australian Base Camp) was that I am stronger, more resilient and more capable than I ever thought I was. Today I feel like I have the inner strength of a Warrior.

So, for my second last post from the Annapurna region trek, I’d like to share with you Warrior II Pose. Warrior II is a strong, powerful pose, which always makes me feel capable of achieving anything, which I now know is true.

 

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Warrior II

 

The term ‘Warrior’ shouldn’t be interpreted as a negative; the idea is that you are a strong compassionate warrior, facing challenges and gaining strength from your practice. As with all aspects of Yoga, the idea is of non-violence and compassion.

Disclaimer: While I am a certified yoga teacher, if you have any issues or concerns, please check with your doctor before performing the pose below. As always, listen to your body and modify as necessary.

Warrior II Pose:

  1. Standing, spread the legs apart about three feet, one foot pointing forwards, one turning slightly inwards.
  2. Raise the arms outwards, palms face down, shoulders relaxed.
  3. On an inhale, bend the front knee deeply, and turn the head to face the outstretched hand on that side.
  4. The waist and centre of the body should remain facing forwards.
  5. Breathe.
  6. Smile.
  7. Hold for a count of three deep inhales and exhales through the nose, and repeat on the other side of the body.

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Namaste,

Natalie

Day 7- 5/10: Lower Sinuwa to Jhinu (Hot Springs) (10.00+ kms)

Rest, Relax and Recharge.

As you may know, my most recent blogs have been revolving around my travels with my husband in Nepal. Today, as I sat in the hot spring (See: Lower Sinuwa to Jhinu Hot Springs), I could feel all my tight, stressed muscles relaxing and knew that it was far more than just the last 7 days of hiking being released. As all the tension that we had been holding in our overworked bodies slowly vanished, I thought about how often throughout this year I had actually taken the time to rest, relax and recharge.

Everybody knows the importance of adequate rest and relaxation in order to recharge our bodies, minds and spirits, but let’s be honest, how much time do we actually devote to resting and relaxing? I know I am guilty of doing work while I am supposed to be sitting relaxing and watching a movie with my husband. I imagine that I am not alone here.

In a busy, fast paced world where we are trying to squeeze everything in, one thing that I do find useful when I need a quick rest, relax and recharge is Nadi Sodhana, or alternative nostril breathing. Below you can read a little bit about this relaxing pranayama and follow my step by step guide so you can practise this at home or at work or whenever you need a little ‘pick-me-up’.

What is Nadi Sodhana (Alternate Nostril Breathing)?

Alternate nostril breathing may sound a little strange at first but once you know how easy it is to incorporate into your routine and how calming it is on your entire body, you’ll be addicted.

So, let’s jump straight to what you are probably thinking at this stage of the blog: How can you breathe out of one nostril at a time and why would you want to? Using your fingers to block off one nostril at a time as you breathe through the other, you alternate your breath between nostrils. Alternating your breath between nostrils in a regular pattern is not only extremely relaxing but also has a balancing and calming effect.

This method is traditionally thought to balance the two sides of your brain and to clear the Nadis, which are energy channels that run along the base of the spine to the crown of the head and recent research suggests that this breathing technique can reduce your blood pressure.

Instructions:

  1. You can practice this breathing technique in any seated position. Make yourself comfortable in Sukasana (Easy Pose) or any other pose in which you feel comfortable, or if you prefer, sit in a chair. You will be sitting for several minutes, so use props as necessary so you can maintain your posture.
  2. Position your right hand in Vishnu mudra by folding your pointer and middle fingers into your palm, leaving your thumb, ring finger, and pinky sticking up (see picture below).
  3. Bring your thumb to the right side of your nose and your ring finger to the left side.
  4. Close your eyes or take a soft gaze downward. Inhale and exhale once to prepare.
  5. Close off your right nostril with your thumb.
  6. Inhale through your left nostril.
  7. Close off your left nostril with your ring finger.
  8. Open and exhale through your right nostril.
  9. Inhale through your right nostril.
  10. Close off your right nostril with your thumb.
  11. Open and exhale through your left nostril.
  12. Inhale through your left nostril.
  13. At first, you might only make it through a few rounds of this breath. Try to work up to doing at least 10 rounds. You can always take a break and then resume the exercise.
  14. If you mind begins to wander, focus on counting the length of your inhales and exhales or on the sensation of your breath on the skin under your nose. It may feel cool as you inhale and warm as you exhale.
  15. If you ever begin to feel light headed, release both nostrils and breath normally.

Disclaimer: While I am a certified yoga teacher, if you have any issues or concerns, please check with your doctor before performing the above breathing technique. As always, listen to your body and modify take breaks as necessary.

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Vishnu mudra

Additional Advice: If you are a little congested, expect this pranayama to move the mucus out so have some tissues handy. However, if you are too stuffed up to breathe out of either nostril you won’t be able to get the intended benefits, so wait until the air passageways are clear to do this exercise.

Benefits

  • Lowers heart rate and reduces stress and anxiety.
  • Said to synchronize the two hemispheres of the brain.
  • Said to purify the subtle energy channels (Nadis) of the body so the prana flows more easily during pranayama practice.

Contraindications

If any of the below are experienced, discontinue the Pranayama exercises and allow the breath to return to normal.

  • Difficulty breathing, or shortness of breath.
  • Tightness in the chest, or hardness behind the forehead.

Cautions

  • Avoid holding the breath.
  • Do not practice Nadi Sodhana if you have a blocked nose.

 

Namaste,

Natalie

Day 5- 3/10: Dovan to ABC (21.75 kms)

Breaking your Comfort Zone.

A lot of the books that I have been reading lately have been talking about doing something outside your comfort zone. And if I am being perfectly honest with you I would have to say that trekking to Annapurna Base Camp (See my travel blog: Dovan to ABC) is about as far out of my comfort zone as me travelling to the moon. With no training we decided that it would be a good idea to engage in a 10-day trek from Nayapul to Poon Hill and then all the way up to Annapurna Base Camp and back down again. It was difficult and tiring and draining… but we made it.

This got me thinking, what was it that we required in order to ‘take the leap of faith’ and just go ahead and try it anyway. Apart from wanting to try something new, we also had trust. Trust in ourselves, trust in our bodies, minds and spirits to get us there and back.

That led me to wonder about what this means for your yoga practice. Do you stay within your comfort zone and never break out? Do you trust and listen to your body?

In order to step outside our comfort zone, you need to have trust. You need to trust yourself and in particular, your body. You must trust your decisions and your ability to know what is right for you.

In that self-trust, you are acknowledging not only your strengths, but also your weaknesses or limitations. I myself have many limitations since my accident that fractured my ankle and partially tore my ACL (See: How did I find yoga? If you are interest in the back story to how I got here today). But despite my limitations I always find a way do to the things I want to do. Maybe some of my poses are not always perfect and I often take longer to do things like walking uphill or mastering a new pose but I get there with perseverance and trust. With trust we realise that we not only have the ability to succeed and thrive, but there is also the possibility that we may fail. But when you think about it, both are ok because when we trust ourselves, we are listening to our bodies and when we listen to our bodies, we can never push ourselves beyond our limits.

If we had been too scared to take the plunge and decide to do the complete trek, we would never have known just what we were made of and would have missed out on so many beautiful experiences.

So, we need to take the plunge, to jump, to try and succeed or fail, and if we do fail, to get back up and try again. We need to get out of our comfort zone and try something new.

So, getting back to the questions I posed earlier, do you stay within your comfort zone and never break out? Do you trust and listen to your body? Do you try new or difficult yoga poses or do you say to yourself that it is too difficult?

One pose that I know a lot of people are freaked out by are handstands so today I wanted to dedicate the rest of this piece to the humble asana- The handstand (Adho Mukha Vrksasana).

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Sometimes, just like in real life, we need to flip our perspectives and get outside our comfort zone (or in this case get ourselves upside down)- even if it freaks us out.

Katie from Honeystuck- Learning to fall talks a bit about handstands but the most pertinent to this post is:

“Handstand takes a lot–strength, alignment, breath. But most of all it takes trust. Trust in your own strength, yes, but also trust that your weaknesses will not kill you.”

 

So, why not step outside your comfort zone and try something new whether it be attempting a handstand, going skydiving, or trekking for 10 days in Nepal.  🙂

 

Namaste,

Natalie

 

 

Day 4- 2/10: Siprong to Dovan (27.62 kms)

Disconnection.

Disconnection. Just like a coin, there are two sides to everything.

One can be a positive: disconnecting from work and technology in order to enjoy spending time with the people we love and doing the things we enjoy doing. The negative is the opposite: feeling disconnected from the people around us, because we are in a constant state of ‘busyness’; finding ourselves becoming more insular and separate. Day 4 into our trek (if you would like to follow my travel blog, please click on this hyperlink: Siprong to Dovan) and with no access to the internet, we are feeling disconnected not only from technology but our family and friends back home. Today I am going to talk about the positives of disconnecting.

Sometimes back in Australia I find myself permanently in a state of being ‘switched on’; available night and day to answer emails, chat to online friends, and working way too many hours a week. Worst of all, this is often to the detriment of my real-life relationships.

Just like my yoga practice brings me back to my mat, back to myself, and back to re-connect with the real-life people around me; trekking in Nepal has also had the same effect. Without access to and the distraction of technology, I found myself deep in my own thoughts, enjoying the sounds of nature and absorbed in meaningful conversations.

Trekking has been an imposed ‘switch off’ both mentally and metaphorically, from the digital clutter that fills a lot of my life. I have found that apart from the mind-blowing scenery in Nepal, the thing that I have enjoyed the most about my 10-day trek through Nepal was being with myself; both being alone with my thoughts and the quietness.

If you are reading this and wondering what does this have to do with yoga or thinking “I’m not keen to go on a 10-day trek through Nepal so that, I too, can practise being with myself”, never fear I have got a solution for you!

Why not try Easy Pose? In my opinion, it is the perfect a way to reconnect with that inner self and disconnect from all of life’s stresses (if only for a little while- I can’t imagine anyone sitting in Easy Pose for 10 days).

Easy Pose (Sukhasana):

  1. Come to a seated position, back straight, and your legs gently crossed in front of the body. If you struggle to maintain a straight back, either sit against a wall, or on a raised cushion/ Yoga block.
  2. Your eyes can be open or closed, but closing them often helps us to focus.
  3. Rest your hands either palms up, facing the sky, or down (if you need to feel more grounded), touching the knees.
  4. Begin to concentrate simply on breathing, inhalations and exhalations through the nose. If it helps, breathe in for a mental count of four, hold the breath for one second at the top, then out again through the nose for four. The moment when the breath is held at the top is thought to represent bliss, peace, the ultimate release.
  5. Alternatively, if yo are more experienced at deep breathing you could try inhale for 4 counts, hold for 4 counts, exhale for 4 counts, hold for 4 counts.

Try to aim to do this for a few minutes each day, to simply ‘be’ with yourself, allowing thoughts to come and go. And of course, ensure you remove any digital distractions before beginning your practice. 🙂

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Easy Pose (Sukhasana)

Disclaimer: While I am a certified yoga teacher, if you have any issues or concerns, please check with your doctor before performing the above pose. As always, listen to your body and modify as necessary.

 

Namaste,

Natalie

Day 2- 30/9: Ulleri to Ghorepani (14.21 kms)

Mantras

A mantra is a sacred utterance, a numinous sound, a syllable, word or phonemes, or a group of words in Sanskrit believed by practitioners to have psychological and spiritual powers. The repetition of a mantra is thought to affirm its meaning to ourselves and change our thought process. It has the potential of cementing a belief into our core being. Mantras tend to be short so they’re easy to remember and can be said repeatedly.

What are personal mantras?

Whether you’re aware of it or not, everyone has personal mantras. You may be good at maths and have a mantra such as, “I find maths easy” or “Maths is/was my strongest subject at school”.

But, for as many positive mantras we have, we also have at least as many negative mantras, such as: “I’m too fat”, “I’m not as pretty as…”, “I’m not good at…”, etc. Negative thoughts that shape our opinion of ourselves are cemented by repetition. We live our lives acting out of negative thoughts and behaviour until we make them a reality.

Why do we use them?

Now that you know this, you can do something to change your negative personal mantras to positive ones, switching your negative thoughts to positive ones… and trust me, this will have a profound effect on your life.

How can we use them?

When your focus lies solely on repeating a mantra, your mind will have little time to fluctuate and produce new thought patterns. Using mantras as a form of meditation makes it easier to concentrate on one thing because you have a mantra to bring your focus back to. Anytime your mind starts to drift, you can simply shift back to the mantra.

My most recent Mantras-

Today was my 2nd day of trekking in Nepal and I was finding it rather difficult (See my travel blog: Ulleri to Ghorepani). I had difficulty breathing, and my knees, feet and legs were sore and tired from all the steps. I decided to try some positive personal mantras to help me carry on. Below are the 2 mantras to helped me hike over 12 kms today in hard terrain from Ulleri to Ghorepani.

“My feet, knees and legs are a pillar of strength.” I repeated this mantra 3 times and then I finished each round with: “Thank you feet, knees and legs for everything that you do for me.” Feeling gratitude as I uttered thanks.

My lungs are big and full and I breathe easily.” I repeated this mantra 3 times and then I finished each round with: “Thank you lungs for everything that you do for me.” Feeling gratitude as I uttered thanks.

I was astonished at just how simple but effective these two positive personal mantras were. So, next time you are finding something difficult, perhaps you too can try a positive personal mantra to get you through.

Examples of other official mantras-

You may have heard some of the following Sanskrit mantras in some of your yoga or meditation classes:

  1. “Aum” or “Om”

Translation: “In Hinduism is known to be the source of all mantras. Om is believed to be the primordial or the ‘first’ sound of the universe generated by the cosmic vibration that resulted in all creation”

  1. Om Namah Shivaya

Translation: “I honor the God within”

  1. Lokah Samastah Sukhino Bhavantu (My all-time favourite mantra)

Translation: “May all beings everywhere be happy and free, and may the thoughts, words, and actions of my own life contribute in some way to that happiness and to that freedom for all.”

Namaste,

Natalie

Day 1- 29/9: Nayapul to Ulleri (12.21 kms)

Wabi-sabi

The Japanese have a marvellous word, wabi-sabi which celebrates the humble, hidden beauty of incomplete and imperfect things.

In nature we see Wabi-Sabi all the time: a jagged cliff’s edge, eroded rocks jutting out of a mountain face or gnarled branches in an untamed forest. As I walked from Nayapul to Ulleri, (See my blog entitled Nayapul to Ulleri for a traveller’s point of view of this leg of our journey), I realised just how many examples of imperfection we find in nature that we deem to be beautiful.

Everywhere nature’s imperfections were being ‘Ohhhed’ and ‘Ahhhed’ over and the best travel pictures always highlight the way the light hits the tangle of the trees or the asymmetry of the mountains.

Nature, as is life, is imperfect. And so are we.

“Wabi-sabi reminds us that we are all transient beings on this planet- that our bodies, as well as the material world around us, are in the process of returning to dust. Nature’s cycles of growth, decay, and erosion are embodied in frayed edges, rust, liver spots. Through wabi-sabi, we learn to embrace both the glory and the melancholy found in these marks of passing time.” (Source: http://www.utne.com/mind-and-body/wabi-sabi).

So, my advice to you is stop and enjoy the imperfections in nature, try not to take yourself too seriously, look beyond what’s on the outside and try to see the beauty (or the wabi-sabi-ness) in everyone and everything.

With that been said, today I’d like to introduce you to a fun and a little kooky pose called Alternative Cactus Pose. Despite looking imperfect, asymmetrical and TBH a little strange, this pose is guaranteed to make you smile, and to love that imperfection that your body is creating. It is a good pose to practise after the traditional Tree pose, which is a more graceful, symmetrical standing balance. 

Disclaimer: While I am a certified yoga teacher, if you have any issues or concerns, please check with your doctor before performing the pose below. As always, listen to your body and modify as necessary.

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Alternative Cactus Pose

Alternative Cactus Pose (above):

  1. Come out of Tree Pose [optional].
  2. Stand tall, raising and bending the right leg and taking hold of it just below the knee with the right hand.
  3. Balancing on the strong, left leg, use the right hand to open the right leg out to the right side slightly.
  4. Bend the left arm and raise it slightly, opening out the left palm and fingers.
  5. Breathe into the balance.
  6. Then repeat on the opposite side.
  7. Finish with traditional Cactus Pose (below) [optional].
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Cactus Pose

 

Namaste,

Natalie

 

P.S. If you like my posts, please click on the like button below this post or click on the follow button to get instant notifications to keep up to date with my latest posts. Xo

Kathmandu to Pokhara via White Water Rafting

As I floated down the river in the raft during our white-water rafting trip in Nepal (See Kathmandu to Pokhara via White Water Rafting if you are interested in reading my travel blog in Nepal), I thought of a quote that I re-read recently:

“Rivers know this, there is no hurry. We shall get there someday.” –AA Milne

And that made me think of Winnie the Pooh peacefully floating down the river with me with one paw in a pot of honey. For a bear with nothing but fluff inside his head, he sure thinks and says some amazingly insightful Buddhist-sounding things. While I am pretty sure Pooh has never studied Buddhism, I did wonder if he (and Buddhists) had the right idea in regards to time and hurrying and I have often wondered if we (‘Western’ countries) could learn something from them.

So, now some life philosophy from our smallest to our mightiest rivers. Even our smallest rivers don’t suggest you stand there and take what life has to give you without fighting back. You just have to look at how a river forges its way through rocks, over trees and through tight spaces with ease and grace to know this is true.

Nor does it suggest that you should stand and watch life go by without you. What is does suggest is there is an art to moving forward. It takes patience and time; flowing instead of rushing. If you flow instead of rush, you will get there someday and maybe do it with some beauty and grace.

Speaking of beauty and grace, makes me think of one of my favourite poses, Dancer’s Pose. This pose makes me feel weightless, limitless, graceful, confident, and perfect in the body I have. I hope it does the same for you!

 

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Dancer’s Pose at Lake Phewa, Pokhara

Disclaimer: While I am a certified yoga teacher, if you have any issues or concerns, please check with your doctor before performing the pose below. As always, listen to your body and modify as necessary.

Dancer’s Pose:

  1. Shift your weight to your right foot and send your breath down to that leg to help you balance.
  2. Bend the knee of your left leg and grab the left foot with the left hand.
  3. Hold your right arm out front to help balance.
  4. Start to lean your upper body forward, balancing on just the right leg. If you are comfortable in the balance, start to press the left foot against the left hand holding it, and move the foot away from the body slightly.
  5. Feel the grace and lightness as you inhale and exhale in this pose and remember to be like the river and not rush getting into or out of the pose!
  6. Come out of the pose gracefully and repeat on the other side of the body.

 

Namaste,

Natalie